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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> and the last time the fcc tried to do this, the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rdrd circui ordered the commission to hold up, that it should first evaluate the impact of any rule changes on the ownership by females and minority. what impact do you think this new rule would have on minority and women in the media? >> well, the truth is that right now, in terms of minorities and women, there is relatively, an embarrassing little amount of ownership. no one doubts that if you move to a situation where corporate america, the big guys, own more and more of the media, it will mean that minorities and women and those folks who don't have big bucks are going to be squeezed even further to the periphery. so it will be bad for minorities. it will be bad for women. and most significantly, it will be bad for american democracy. >> some people argue that newspapers are failing anyway. that they're going under, losing advertising, cutting their staffs, losing their readership. and that it would be a good thing for these big, profitable corporations like ge and murdoch's news corporation to take
." as the youngest mayor of a top 50 u.s. city, my guest today symbolizes the emergence of a new generation of latinos in american political life-- the mayor of san antonio, texas, julian castro. i'm maria hinojosa, this is one on one. mayor julian castro, welcome to our program. >> thank you very much for having me. >> hinojosa: so your mom was a big time political activist in the 1960s and 1970s-- chicana activist. your brother is in state government in texas. you're the youngest mayor... or one of the youngest mayors in the country, san antonio, and people are saying, "this family has got a political future." so is that kind of the way you had it all planned out? >> oh, it's... well, that's the way that it's working right now, it seems, but not the way that we planned out. >> hinojosa: so you didn't even think, like, when you were a kid you were like, "i'm going to become a politician like my mom." >> no. you know what's interesting was that because my mother was so involved at that time in different mexican american issues and women's issues, she would drag us to political rallies, to m
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)